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Show Notes:

Rebecca Ray 
Welcome to Hello Rebecca Ray, our collective home for courage, growth, and human to human connection. I’m your host, Dr. Rebecca Ray, human, clinical psychologist, author, and educator. I know only too well how fear, comparison, and self-doubt can stifle your potential. This podcast is all about brave and meaningful living, and how you can make your authentic contribution to the world today and every day.

Rebecca Ray 
Hi, lovely ones, welcome to episode number 58. I am lucky enough to have the amazing Fiona Killackey with me today. Fiona is a business coach and an author under the brand of My Daily Business Coach. And it’s no stretch for me to say that she’s actually changed my life with some of her strategies. And I wanted to share those strategies with you today, no pressure Fiona,  she’s probably now feeling like she didn’t know I was going to introduce her like that. But it’s the truth, I actually feel like, there are some strategies that Fiona took me through towards the middle of last year, I think we went through them. And they actually changed the way not only I saw my business, but I also the way I saw my potential. So today we’re going to talk about money. Because I think it’s an incredibly sensitive button in business sensitive button in the entrepreneurial world. And if we get time, we might also circle around to time blocking. I did an episode on time blocking a couple of weeks ago Fiona, because you know that I’ve just gotten into it recently. And I know that you’re the master of it. So we might if we can’t get time, we’ll come back around to that. But welcome. Thank you so much for talking to me today.

Fiona Killackey 
Oh, no, thank you so much for having me and what a beautiful Welcome. I’m so touched, it’s just the loveliest thing to think that you’ve changed in any tiny, miniscule way somebody else’s life for the better. So that’s lovely, thank you.

Rebecca Ray 
Absolutely not just a miniscule way, either you, your strategies have helped change my relationship with my business. And that is no small thing. Because you and I both believe that there’s not really a distinction between life and business. There can’t be especially when you’re a solopreneur. One is the other. They coexist. And so it’s about finding that place in your world that your business fits. And if it’s a source of stress, then really how sustainable is that? And I think when people are starting out in the entrepreneurial world, it can be so incredibly overwhelming, especially because often there’s costs that are unaccounted for. And so you end up spending a stack of money to create your vision. But there can be a timeframe before you actually make that money back. So can we talk about dollars, please?

Fiona Killackey 
Yeah. Money! Yeah. No, all the money. Oh, I love talking about the first thing that I will talk about with anyone who works with me. And I think their first, you know, part which you which you pointed to and also you are the master of mindset is that there’s a huge mindset around money. And we don’t even realise that we have it until somebody asks us. I know that in my business, the amount of people over the last six and a half years that start the conversation with money by saying some sort of version of, oh, this might be really small amount for you. And I’m like, I have no judgement on your money. It is just a figure, it is just numbers that we’re going to plug into an excel sheet  and we’re going to just run the maps. And so that’s the first thing, we all have, you know, these limiting beliefs or some you know, sometimes people have great beliefs about it. But majority of people have a belief that what I earn equals my self worth, and what I earn should be far more than they currently are, even when people have like really great incomes. And especially here in Australia, like we you know, we’re in a very privileged part of the world. And I just think we have somehow bought into this lie that a successful business is one that is making a huge amount of money, or instead of looking at the successful business, it’s one where my values are in alignment, where I feel comfortable, where I’m not yelling at my kids, where I have time in my week to do something else. That’s what I think success is and so that’s that’s kind of the questions that I ask people to start with. I hope that makes sense.

Rebecca Ray 
Absolutely. But how now I’m interested. How did you get to the place where you could just see money as a figure that you throw into a spreadsheet without the emotional attachment to it? Assuming you started out with an emotional attachment to money.

Fiona Killackey 
Yeah, I absolutely had an emotional attachment to money. I think everybody does to some degree, it’s just sort of looking at that and like having a spectrum of it, where do you sit to start with? So the way when I started my business, I, and I kind of need to caveat by sort of putting some context I am a child of my, I am a migrant to this country. So we came out in the 80s, I was three and a half, my parents knew no one here like not a single person. My dad had been offered a job here. My parents are, Irish. And they still Yeah, they are even if they’ve passed away. So they came out with like, we don’t know anyone here, we’re going to work our ass off. You know, they created communities around themselves. But my mum was a nurse and she worked night shifts, my dad was, he spent most of his life as a captain on ships, and then came to Australia because he’d been given a job teaching at RMIT in kind of maritime engineering, and then he kind of proceeded to get different jobs, in the Port of Melbourne and, and so all I saw, not all I saw, but a lot of what I saw was shift work, my dad would work 6am to 6pm, or 6pm to 6:30am. And my mum would also be working shift work and there was this constant, not worry, always about money, but just this understanding that I felt like I’m never going to be as rich as the people around me.

Rebecca Ray 
There was like this inherent scarcity?

Fiona Killackey 
Yeah. And we knew like I, my parents, scrimped and scrimped and saved to get us to private schools. And I was very much aware that I was in the bottom rung of the, you know, and my parents, my mum worked for a start, a lot of my friend’s parents, their mother did not work. They had the Mercedes, the BMW, they were able to go on every school camp, even if that was overseas, whereas I knew it’s not even a question. I’m not even gonna ask, can I go skiing overseas to Europe, because there would just be a no, that’s not. So in some way my parents have these very much you work hard, I heard all the time, money doesn’t grow on trees, Fiona. I got a job as soon as I was 14 and nine months, and prior to that, we would get $5 per basket of ironing. So there was for us, it was six of us in the house, four kids, you know, there was always ironing to be done. So we learned very quickly, that money doesn’t come for free, you’re not given anything for free. However, I also think that they also showed us the value of things. So they put a lot of money into education, because they were very, you know, especially with two daughters, my dad was very much you never, I don’t want you to ever have to rely on somebody else for your money, I want you to have education, once you have education, no one can ever take it from you. And then the other thing that they put money into was travel. So we saw a lot of the world, they had both travelled extensively. And in their later years, I mean, they spent 20 years in retirement just travelling as much as they could. So I think they did give me great things, as well as giving me the sort of lack, you know, sort of an idea that money doesn’t grow on trees. Also, I should mention without going into too much detail they’re obviously, their Irish, their Catholic. And so there was a lot of, we did a lot of volunteering, we did a lot of giving to the you know, giving to the homeless, giving things that my parents always volunteered. And so there was always drummed in as well that to want to have more money is a little greedy, because if you have, you give and you shouldn’t, you should just have what you need and then you should give the rest. That’s a whole lot of money stuff. So I had to look into that first. But come back to your question about sorry I’m Irish so that is why I talk.

Rebecca Ray 
No, I’m all for it. And I was actually going to say with the Irish Catholic background, that’s actually really progressive of your dad in particular, to want you to not be dependent on anyone else in your life and to be able to shift into the world and be totally independent financially.

Fiona Killackey 
Yeah, so what had happened to him growing up in Bray was this tiny town outside of Dublin, his dad died of a massive heart attack in front of him and he was 14. And his brother was 4 and his other brother was 15. And so his mum had to turn their house into a bed and breakfast. So that was the only way that she could survive. And so he thought that and then he and his brothers kind of lived out the back and he would get up at 4am to start helping with the cooking and everything. So he and then he left, he finished school really early so that he could go off to England and make money to send back. So he was like, I never want my daughters to end up like my mom. So that’s where that came from, as well. But yeah, and so then the numbers. So when I was working in my last employed job, I was head of marketing at Mimco, which is a large accessories company, and I was on really good money, more money than I had ever had previously. I liked the title. I liked all the status and everything. So when I mapped out my business, we had actually just bought our first house and in doing that the mortgage broker had said, what’s your survive number? I’d never heard of that term. So he was like your survive number is what you need to survive. Obviously, a mortgage broker needs to know that, the bank needs to know that you can pay it back. So that was really good timing. Because then I started planning my business, I thought, what do I need to survive, and if I could take half of the salary that I’m currently on, we will be fine. And, you know, really serious discussion with my husband, because I was also, I have been brought up very, my mom was a huge feminist. So I was definitely not of the, it’s fine, I’ll just rely on his salary. That’s just in me, that is not a good or bad thing. That’s just my viewpoint. And so I had to sit down and go, if I earnt half of what I can, like, have earnt, we will be okay, we’ll be able to pay our bills and everything else. So that is the number that I started with. Was very practical.

Rebecca Ray 
So can you explain survive number, thrive number and how that relates to your money mapping technique. And then I want to talk about how you work with the relationship between those two numbers psychologically for yourself.

Fiona Killackey 
Survive number is literally so I’d say survive and thrive. A survive, number everything, your business, and you need to survive. So in my household have two kids, one’s at childcare, one’s at school, we have a home, we are renovating, we have home insurance, car insurance, what else, health insurance. And so there are certain things that absolutely have to get paid. I mean, we cannot be behind on our mortgage, we can’t be behind on childcare, like it has to get done. So those are the numbers that we had to sit down and map out every month, how much is that coming to? And then I need to contribute to the house, you know, I need to look at that number. And my husband and I both contribute to that. So that’s one part of it is the personal life. So then what does the business need to pay me, Fiona Killackey, as an employee to be able to cover my household needs, and then the survive part of the business is, you know, you and I both work online, things like zoom, Calendly, my website, I have a Online Business Manager. Now I have a podcast that is a perfect, you know, a huge part of my, like marketing. And so there are certain things that I’m paying for that I absolutely need for the business to survive. I also have a company, I need to pay the company, you know, asick or whatever it’s called, I need to pay WorkCover because I’m an employee, there’s different things. So you have to add, what does the business need to survive? And then what do I personally need to bring into the household to survive, and then that’s your survive number. But no one wants to aim for survive number because it’s just like a life of misery. So we create the Thrive number. So the Thrive number is all that, so  say you survive numbers a $100,000, just for the sake of numbers, and then you wanted to, you know, you want to employ somebody else, so you’re like, okay, they going to be part time, I’m going to employ them at, let’s say, $40,000. So now you’ve got 140, I want to redo our website, that’s $5,000, I want to redo the branding. That’s another 5000. So now you’re sitting at 150 that the business needs to make. But you may have some other things like I might want to go overseas once a year and do a research trip, or you know, x y z, and then you put that together and that’s your Thrive figure. And so that is a much better, I found way to do it than to pick some arbitrary number, or to say, I need to earn what I used to earn in a paid role. Because in a paid role, you have things like compassionate leave, you have sick leave, you have, you know, a desk, you have equipment that’s not, you don’t own it. And so there’s all these extras when you have your own business. And so that’s what you need to come to. And when you said that the, what was your question around survive to thrive, like the relationship between

Rebecca Ray
Yeah, so I wanted to know how you kind of psychologically adjusted to create a Thrive number for yourself, that you then work towards in a way that you believe it’s possible. So one of the things that I’ve noticed in people that I work with is let’s say we had a Thrive number 200 grand, as opposed to a survive number of 100 grand, there’s a huge psychological gap in between one number and the next. You know, that gap I’m talking about where it’s kind of like people get choked by fear. All of a sudden their self worth stories come up. Their lack of belief in themselves comes up and there’s this like, significant voice of doubt. So I’m wondering, how do you personally work with that so that the thrive number that you choose is not just something that’s realistic, but it’s something that you believe you can actually achieve?

Fiona Killackey 
Yeah, I mean, I’ve had to go through so the first, like if people do have a money mapping course and and every client that works with me goes through that course. And one of the first questions is, you know, what are you, when do you talk about money, like when do you talk about it? How often do you talk about it. Pretty much I’d say 90% of the time people write never, I never talk about it, it’s taboo. I, you know or I learned this from my parents or very rarely, there’ll be somebody who says we have a really financially open family and we talked about everything. Most of the time it’s not talked about. So I had to work through that as well, I had to look at things. I am the youngest of four. My eldest brother is a professor in psychology. And he’s doing, he’s a director of a major institution. My sister’s a GP, she has multiple houses, like it’s, you know, my other brother was a lawyer, ah no sorry, he was a CFO, and now he’s become a lawyer. He used to work really, you know, top banks across London. And so I was always like, Oh, I’m the creative, and the creatives don’t earn much, and I’m never going to be like them. And so I had to work through my own things of going, I’m gonna stop telling myself this story that creative equals doesn’t get paid that much. Yeah. So I had to look at that and really, like, uncover where do those come from? You know, even talking to my husband. Like, what are his beliefs around money? And what beliefs do we want our kids to have? Because I found myself saying to my oldest, who’s now nine. So I started this business seven years ago, I found myself often saying to him, money doesn’t grow on trees. Look how much that is, that would be all of your pocket money gone. Like it’s, you know, you have this balance between wanting to educate them, and also not putting your own limiting beliefs on top of them. Absolutely. Yeah. So I had to work through all of that. You did mention before the practical like reality, realistic side of it. For me, that has always grounded me to go back to the numbers. So if I think I’d like to earn this, then I have to reverse engineer the numbers to add up to that. So if I’m like,

Rebecca Ray 
Can you talk about that process?

Fiona Killackey 
Yeah. So the first thing, once you have your Thrive number, you put it literally in a circle in the middle of a page. And I’m very visual learner. So some people prefer to put it in an Excel sheet, whatever works for you. And so I’ll put that in the middle of it a a4 piece of paper. And I will then start putting the bubbles around at the different revenue streams. So in my business, I have one on one coaching, I have group coaching, I have speaking gigs, I have my book, I have e-commerce, like, you know, e products, like ebooks, online courses, and stuff like that. So I will, and workshops. And so I will put each of them in its own bubble, so one on one coaching, and then I’ll look at realistically how much one on one coaching can I do, I work three days a week, I work in school hours, usually, except for Thursday, my long day. So I can only see a certain amount of one on one clients a week, I can’t create more days in the week. And so if I’m capping that at let’s say, on average, you know, I work 40 weeks a year, because I am the predominant primary carer for my kids and so I take the school holidays off. And if I have, you know, one day a week that I’m seeing six clients, and on average, they’re maybe doing $400 per per session. If I’m filling up all of that, I think like the max is around $96,000 from that one revenue stream for one day a week. And so I cannot say our one on one coaching needs to bring in $300,000.

Rebecca Ray 
It’s impossible.

Fiona Killackey
Yeah, it’s impossible for me to do that. And so this is where people when they come up, it can either go one of two ways. Either they come up with a thrve figure and when they start doing the calculations, quite often surprisingly, people are like, Oh, I could, I could totally, I can totally hit that number. Or I’m so far from that number, how do I get there. And that’s when we look at, you know, your your value perception in the market, your marketing, what you’re actually charging, is the demand there. And then just stuff like with one client, I always remember one of my earliest clients, she was like, busting her guts for this one revenue stream. And then this other revenue stream was just sitting idle, and it was a complete moneymaker, and busting her guts for this thing that was potentially going to bring in a few thousand dollars and then she had this other thing that could have brought her you know, between $1,200 and $1,800 a day without her doing much. And it was it was literally like a she has a beautiful location. So it was sort of like, you know, you could just hire the location out for like wedding shoots and so it was just this like, wow, wow, I am really like not focusing on the right thing here.

Rebecca Ray 
It sounds like there’s two different ways that your clients think. One is, actually I never realised how close I could get to that number. If I just looked at these revenue streams that I didn’t realise have been staring me in the face, and I’m just not seeing them. And then there’s the other side, which is actually I need this number in order to be able to have some freedom in my business, because why else do we go into business? Right? Like, you want to make a difference in the world, but you also want to have a lifestyle that comes with it. And then there’s creating or finding the revenue streams to be able to make that thrive number happen.

Fiona Killackey 
Yeah, so so an example that comes up a bit in service based businesses is we have these packages. So say and I’m the same,  I have like a six month package, a three month package of coaching. And what, you know, people might do six months, and then they might go away, and then they might come back. But one is the actual marketing of that post purchase part of the buyer cycle. So buyer cycle is really awareness. If someone’s interested, then they go into research, if they’ve researched, they like it, they go into a point of evaluation, are you the right person for me, then purchase is this easy to actually pay you. And then post purchase is, I had a great experience now I want to tell everyone else about it, or I want to come back to you. And so the first thing is, most people do not do post purchase marketing, ever. They are like, oh, you worked with me? Great. We both had an enjoyable time, bye you’re on your way. They don’t set something for like six months down the track, or three months down the track? Or what am I getting in touch with that person again. So that’s the first part. And then the second thing is we’re not looking at the most help we can give people. So in service base, to say you have a six month package, you might look at your revenue stream and be like, I actually need to make more money, or I need to stabilise my income, because it’s going up and down and down. And so you might look at that six month pack and go, what would it look like as a 12 month package? Or what would it look like as a six month with three quarterly follow ups? Or what would it look like if it was a six month with a workshop three months later, to kind of go over everything that we’ve done together. And that can work in every business. So if you are selling products, you know, making sure that you have a consistent, you know, email setup so that you know if if candles or say like, I’m just looking around my desk, say you have like lip balm, or lip balm is something that people buy on impulse. But if you had a lip balm subscription to your favourite lip balm, like how awesome, you would just be like, great, I know that it comes every two months exactly what I’m just about to run out. And so people don’t, I don’t think that they look at that they sort of go, well, I’ve got this six month package. And I can only do so many of them. It’s like but what could happen if that extended. So even in my own business, when I looked at that, I just went to a couple of clients and said, I’m thinking of doing a 12 month package, this is what it would look like it’s more expensive, but every six months, we do a whole day together. And I went to three of them. And two of them instantly wrote back within half an hour. Yep, sounds good. Sign me up for next year. And then the other one said, I just need a bit of time to think about this. And then eventually he came back. So it’s just thinking a bit differently. And I think when we’re forced to save money, and again, I’m really aware that this is a very privileged conversation. But I know that say when we were buying a house, we thought we’d saved a huge amount. Like we’d come back from London, we’d saved all this money. And then the mortgage broker was like you actually need like another 17,000. And you need it soon. And I was like, how are we going to get 17,000. But when you want something badly enough, and this is where it because it’s your Thrive number and you’ve created these things and you really want like a trip overseas or new uniforms or whatever, then you’re you have that intrinsic incentive to get it versus somebody on Instagram told me I should be earning X amount of figures. So now I’m trying to get that. And so I think like we just found ways to to save that money cut back on where we’re spending, you know, selling stuff that we had in the house like it was I want this so much, I’m going to do whatever I can to get that money. And I think we sometimes forget that in business we do, we just can’t see the wood for the trees sometimes.

Rebecca Ray 
Yeah. It’s really interesting to hear you say that, because what comes up for me when I say that I have these two parts of myself one part is yes, I agree. Because I I’m very much I kind of run with this internal locus of control, which essentially means in psychological terms, that I believe I control my own destiny, the efforts that I put in control the outcomes of my life, within reason. I mean, I understand circumstances can’t be controlled much of the time, but ultimately, I believe in the actions that I take will shape my future. Then there’s another part of me that got burnt out in clinical practice and that’s the part of me that goes Yes, but yes, but there are certain things that I now know I won’t do and or can’t do, to make sure that my mental health stays stable, and stays at a certain level so that I am okay. Like, I can’t go back to clinical practice. I’ve tried it doesn’t work. I’m not my time in that kind of work is done. And what, so when we did the money mapping exercise together, one of the things that I found was you were able to illuminate revenue streams for me that were okay, given my conditions. And I think this is kind of an important part of the conversation because if you come up with revenue streams that are not okay, for your life non-negotiables, then they’re not achievable. It’s not, it’s not, it’s fine. If, if you know it’s a fit for you, but if it’s not a fit for you, and it’s going to burn you out, you’ve tried it before and there’s an ick factor with it. You know how there’s some tasks that we have to do that we just don’t love doing, like some people hate being on video, if you then say that you’re going to create a whole video course to sell online, and that’s going to bring you in 30 grand this year. And yet you look at that bubble on the money map and go, and it makes you go ughh like that’s,  I could think of nothing worse than that stream is essentially inaccessible to you.

Fiona Killackey 
Yeah, completely. And I think that’s when you need to really go back to yourself. And I don’t know, like, I know, some people love it or hate it. I really liked the 16 personalities.com free personality test. Yeah, but really understanding yourself and really also understanding your value. So like, my values are literally on my desk, I’m showing them to you now.

Rebecca Ray 
Just a tiny pink post it notes.

Fiona Killackey 
No, it’s got my values. Freedom is number one. And so, you know, I know, because I’ve worked with it. I, if I did corporate consulting, which is what I started off doing, you know, those proposals were $60,000. $1,500 a day, twice a week, for months and months and months to me to sit in meetings or, you know, doing $10,000 workshops. And, and some of it, you know, I really enjoy, but other times, I don’t. So I could totally make on the revenue stream. You know, I’m gonna hit $300,000, just from corporate consulting, I don’t want to do corporate consulting.

Rebecca Ray 
Yes.

Fiona Killackey 
Like it really impacts pretty much impacts all of these, it impacts freedom. Because I like where I live. I choose to live I live in a beautiful area called North Warrandyte. In Melbourne, I choose to live there, it is a 40 minute drive from the city where most of the corporates are. So it impacts massively my freedom, I don’t like, this makes me sound like some really antisocial person. I don’t necessarily like sitting in a boardroom with 10 other people for an entire day. I like to go get my cups of tea, I like to do my meditation, I like to put on my Beyonce. And so that’s how I work best. And so I know that over time, I’ve been able to remove, I started with corporate consulting, because it is a cash cow. And, and it’s great. But the other thing, it doesn’t impact the alignment too, if I work with a small business owner, and let’s say they are paying me, so I just did a workshop the other day, and you know, they’re paying 1000s. Every single dollar matters to that person, they are wanting everything from me, and I love it!  It’s like you are going to change based on this. Whereas I have done other corporate workshops, where there’s, you know, 18 people in a boardroom, they could not care less, it’s not their money. Sometimes there’ll be on their phone while I’m talking it is, it’s not that enjoyable. That’s not all corporate consulting, some of them, I absolutely love the jobs. But yeah, so I think the revenue streams have to be aligned to your values. And you know, where you want to go in life as well. Otherwise, it’s just money. And the other thing, sorry, I’m like talking so much. But the other thing that my parents taught me, my dad particularly is, my mom died suddenly, in 2017, my dad died at the end of 2019. And he was in a nursing home, he we’d sold his house, he was in a private, you know, really top notch nursing home, he had more money than he could ever have imagined in the bank. And he couldn’t, he couldn’t walk, he couldn’t drive. He didn’t really want to move much around his room in the nursing home. You know, his memory was going. So all the money in the world. I said to him at one point after we sold the house, Dad do you want to like, go out and buy a Rolex. Do you want to do this, do that. And he was like the actually the only thing he asked for was, let’s go get a case of top notch whiskey because that’s real richman. And he actually died before he finished the whiskey. So, you know, it was like, all the money in the world doesn’t mean anything if your health is not there. If you can’t go see your friends, if you you know, so it’s sort of like, yes, I’m all for making money. But I’m also looking at, like, how do I want to live? And what’s my legacy and all of that as well.

Rebecca Ray 
I love this so much. Okay, so let’s leave listeners with what they can do after they’ve done their circles. So my specific question is, you’ve got your Thrive number, you’ve worked out your revenue streams and how those revenue streams are going to help you meet your Thrive number. What do you do then? Because what happens if we’re almost in March? March 2022. Holy shit, how did that happen? And, and you’re now we’re nearly a full quarter into the year. I mean, I am jumping a bit. We’re not at the end of March yet. But what do you do then? Are you constantly should you be checking in with the circles? What happens if the circles aren’t happening at the speed that you want them to? What do you do?

Fiona Killackey 
Yeah, so there’s a few things. Validation is a huge one. So if you’ve come up with especially with a new offering, you want to validate that. You want to make sure that it’s actually going to work. So that will be you know, like I said before, I shot off an email to three clients that I thought would actually take this up just to see if they would be like, Oh, God, no, that’s really expensive. And then, you know, you could be putting things on Instagram like, you know, what would you pay for, not necessarily, what would you pay for these, but I’ve got this exciting thing do you want to join the waitlist, just see what people think that’s the first thing, the validation. And then the other part is revenue tracking. So I literally take that number that survive, oh sorry, thrive number, and I will divide it literally just really simply in an Excel sheet, I will divide it by 52 weeks, and I will see how am I actually tracking week to week or you could just do it at like the end of the month. So at the end of January, I should have earnt this, where am I at? Am I  way away from it, am I not. Because the other thing is, too many people just wait for tax time. And then they figure out how much they actually earned how much they spend. And they’re like, oh my gosh. Whereas if you’re looking at it every single day, or every you know, it doesn’t need to be an obsession, but 10 minutes, twice a week, having a look at your money. You need to understand where it is coming from, and really importantly, where it’s actually going. Yeah. And if you are assessing, you know, oh, I had this whole revenue stream, it’s not really working. And I’d be going back to it and rejigging the numbers, and really asking yourself, Am I, again, is it really my Thrive number? Or is it just some number that somebody has told me, this many years in, you should be earning this. I’ve heard that so many times from clients, oh, we should be hitting the multi millions now that we’re this many years in and I’m like, says who? Yeah, where did that come from? And so I would be looking at it. And then I’d be seeing if I’m doing everything in my power. Because you can you can put down like a revenue stream. But you’re like, well, what have I done this week to get there? Nothing, like I haven’t reached out to anybody. I haven’t put, you know, I haven’t been sending anyone some messages. I haven’t, you know, made sure it’s really clear on my bio, what, if I’m using social media, what I’m actually offering. I think that’s the other thing we can, it’s not just a dream, mapping, it’s an actual money and taking action mapping, but I’m very anti hustle. So it needs to work for you as well, which is where kind of the time management comes in. And when I said before, I can only do this many coaching sessions, that actually when I did the money mapping years ago, that actually was what led to me doing group coaching, because I was like, okay, well, what could I do with group coaching? Which is two hours a month. How much could that bring in if I had 10 people in the session?

Rebecca Ray 
I love that. So the spreadsheet represents two things, then, how much money is each revenue stream bringing in at this stage of the year, in this particular week, or in this particular quarter. And perhaps also, what action am I taking towards enlivening that revenue stream. So perhaps that revenue stream is not bringing in money yet, but you know that you sent three key emails this week, that are seeds that you’re planting, which might pay off in August, but it has to be done now.

Fiona Killackey 
Yeah. And that’s the thing, you just don’t know, what will pay off like I, last year, I sort of said to myself, I need to get myself out there a bit more. I’m not just you know, because I had become a bit not necessarily complacent, but you know, I’ve got the podcast, I’ve got my Sunday email, had the book, or have the book. And so yeah, I just saw an email that came out from our local council. And I, I just replied back and said, hey, just letting you know, I live in the area, I’m in the business coaching space, if ever you need a speaker or somebody to do a workshop, and then they came back this year, and they booked me in for like, you know, a whole lot of stuff. And I’m like, oh, and they’ve got a really, you know, they’ve got a healthy budget. So

Rebecca Ray 
I love that, so diplomatic. That’s a healthy budget. It’s so unusual, isn’t it?

Fiona Killackey 
It was like, you know, it wasn’t this whole oh, I’ve got to create, I mean, I talk about with my clients, their pitch decks, and we have strategies around that. But sometimes it’s as simple as, let me just reply to them. Or let me put up a flyer at the local kindergarten that my kids go to and tell people that I do cake, you know, I do wedding cakes. So like sometimes we forget, it’s so interesting, I think with social media, and I’ve been in marketing for like 20 years way before social media came along. We forget there are so many other ways to market and get ourselves out there. Then just posting on Instagram.

Rebecca Ray 
Yeah. Oh my god, you’re brilliant. I love you so much. You know that. Every time I talk to you, I feel so invigorated.

Fiona Killackey 
Oh, thank you. Thank you.

Rebecca Ray 
Can you please tell listeners where they can find you.

Fiona Killackey 
You can find me on on Instagram @mydailybusinesscoach. You can find a whole lot of information including a bunch of freebies, at mydailybusinesscoach.com And if you want to listen to the podcast, which is just called the My Daily Business Coach podcast,

Rebecca Ray 
Fiona Killackey you rock thank you so much.

Fiona Killackey 
You’re so welcome. Thank you for this and for everything that you do.

Rebecca Ray 
Lovely ones, thank you so much for listening to Hello, Rebecca Ray. If you’ve got something meaningful from this episode, then the most meaningful thing you can do is jump on over to wherever you listen to your podcast episodes and leave a review. Because it’s those reviews that help this podcast stay. Make sure to subscribe. And if you’re generous enough to share this episode, thank you so much. I love seeing your shares on social media. So please tag me, catch you next time.